Marketing Without Money? Therese Tarlinton Reveals the Secret

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In this episode of the Engage Video Marketing podcast, we’ll talk about the power of partnership as a powerful marketing strategy for your business with Therese Tarlinton.

A little bit about Therese:

When interesting companies want to expand their audience, increase their credibility, and make a bigger profit, they come to her.  Therese knows how to speak to brands to secure collaborations, contras, partnerships and sponsors, so they can grow.

Early in her career, she convinced Jeep, Sesame Street and United Colors of Benetton to become licensing partners and manufactured under their brands, using the power of partnerships to create a global business.

She wrote her first book SWAP! Marketing without money to help brands secure partnerships – sharing all her best secrets.  It’s proving pretty popular and has become an Amazon best seller, won three Gold Medals and was awarded the ABLE 2022 Book of the Year. 

If you found this episode of value I’d love for you to reach out and let me know on Instagram @engage_ben or email podcast@engagevideostg.wpenginepowered.com

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Transcript of the Interview: ** Note: the following transcript was generated by AI and therefore may contain some errors and omissions.

1

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 Marketing without money?

 

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Sounds good to me.

 

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In this episode of the Engage Video Marketing Podcast, we’ll find out the secret to one of the most powerful marketing strategies that any business can tap into, often without spending a cent.

 

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Are you ready?

 

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Let’s dive in.

 

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G’day and welcome back to the Engage Video Marketing Podcast.

 

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This is episode 287.

 

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I’m Ben Amos and I’m on a mission to grow confident video strategists.

 

9

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So I’m so glad that you’re here joining me in this episode.

 

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 So today’s episode is basically a masterclass in one of the most powerful marketing strategies that businesses can use today.

 

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And my guest, well, she wrote the book about it.

 

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We’re talking partnerships.

 

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And I know there are going to be a few ideas sparked as we learn more today.

 

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 Therese Tarlington is the partnerships queen.

 

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When interesting companies want to expand their audience, increase their credibility, and make a bigger profit, they come to her.

 

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Therese knows how to speak to brands to secure collaborations, contras, partnerships, and sponsors so that they can grow.

 

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See, early in her career, she convinced Jeep, Sesame Street, and United Colors of Benetton to become licensing partners and manufacture under their brands.

 

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 using the power of partnerships to therefore create a global business.

 

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She wrote her first book, Swap, Marketing Without Money, to help brands secure partnerships, sharing all her best secrets in that book.

 

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So we’re going to be talking today about partnerships of all types,

 

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 from big brand deals right down all the way down to collaborations with businesses in your local network.

 

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So there’s something in this episode for everyone.

 

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So without further ado, let’s just dive in and let me introduce you to Therese Tarlington.

 

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Therese, welcome to the podcast.

 

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Thank you, Ben.

 

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It’s such a great pleasure to be here.

 

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 Well, I’m glad that you decided to join us.

 

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We actually met in person recently at Kate Toon’s event down in Sydney, which we had Kate on the show probably a handful of weeks back.

 

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So for those who listened to that episode, that’s what brought us together, Therese.

 

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And you told me a little bit about what you do, and I thought that’s

 

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 really interesting and I know my audience is going to be interested in hearing what you have to share as well and you’ve written the book about it as I mentioned in the introduction.

 

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But before we get into talking about partnerships in marketing, I’d love to know what got you into marketing and maybe tell us a little bit of your story.

 

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Fantastic.

 

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 So Ben, I started out in marketing a really long time ago.

 

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So I was one of these lucky people who actually found my craft quite early.

 

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I went and studied marketing and then started working in marketing while I was at uni.

 

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 And in that journey, it was, you know, really early.

 

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One of my first marketing jobs was actually at Phillips and they created the CD-R, the recordable CD.

 

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I mean, gosh, that’s like a thousand years ago, right?

 

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And through that, I fell in love with product marketing.

 

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It’s something that I really enjoy.

 

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 And from that, I had an idea about having my own business and I started manufacturing products overseas as well, which was an amazing journey where I really kind of found, which we’ll talk about, but I found my passion for partnerships because I was able to do licensing deals that really helped me elevate and propel my business into quite a few countries.

 

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 So since I’ve sold that company and I work with a lot of different kind of business owners, and so my passion is really about crafting people’s stories, like why we buy from people we know, like and trust.

 

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 and brands to me are just, you know, people.

 

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There’s people behind those brands and I really want to make sure that they come alive and also that it’s, you know, it’s hard out there so to actually collaborate together.

 

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But for me this has really been, marketing has been my discipline, my professional craft,

 

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 But it’s also been a really big passion of mine as well.

 

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And so I’ve been able to work for some really big global companies and then work in my own companies to actually build this career.

 

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 Yeah, awesome.

 

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Thanks for sharing.

 

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So you mentioned there, you know, partnerships and initially the licensing deals that you got with your earlier businesses.

 

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And when was it in your story that you realized that this idea of partnerships in business or in marketing was so powerful?

 

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Can you take us back to that time and maybe that realization that you had at that time?

 

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 Yeah, sure Ben.

 

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So for me it was, I saw a product, it was a Jeep, as in Jeep the vehicle, had done a collaboration with Colcraft and Colcraft is a really huge manufacturer of baby products in the US.

 

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And so together they had created a Jeep baby stroller.

 

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 Now, I didn’t have kids yet, but I saw this product which combined my two loves, which was branding and babies.

 

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And at that stage, there wasn’t any branded baby products in the Australian marketplace.

 

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So I convinced Colcraft to give me the rights to sell the product in Australia.

 

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 And it was, I bought the product in and I did kind of my first collaboration, my first partnership, unbeknownst to me, when I took the sample into Jeep, the head office in Australia, and I showed them the Jeep baby stroller.

 

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And I met with the PR manager who was just about to go on maternity leave.

 

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And she turned around to me and she said, I love these.

 

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These are fantastic.

 

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How about I do your PR and you give me a stroller?

 

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 And I said, oh my gosh, yes, that would be great.

 

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I would love to do that.

 

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Now, she got me in every newspaper and magazine across the country, everywhere from the Financial Review to men’s magazines, to home magazines, baby, everything in between, New Idea.

 

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And that attention got me into my first retailer, which was Target.

 

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And when the products were in Target, then I got a phone call one day, and it was from Huggies.

 

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 And so Huggies gave me a call and they said, we’ve seen your stroller.

 

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We think it’s fantastic.

 

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And it actually has given us an idea.

 

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What we want to do is put together a competition for mother and baby to win a Jeep.

 

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And what we’d love to do is work with you.

 

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If you would just give us a few prizes, a few strollers that we could give away as prizes.

 

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 then we will do everything.

 

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We will put your product on the side of every nappy box in the country, all the point of sale, we’ll take care of all the advertising, we’ll promote it out and it’s only going to cost you a few strollers.

 

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So that blew my mind and it actually blew up my business.

 

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So

 

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 I was just operating from my spare bedroom at home and that exposure won.

 

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I mean, from what is marketing?

 

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Marketing is reach.

 

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You know, marketing is credibility and it’s about differentiation.

 

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I mean, they’re the three great things about what partnerships deliver.

 

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And so it was able to deliver me this amazing reach where all of a sudden it got me in front of

 

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 you know, thousands of parents.

 

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It gave me the credibility of being united with a brand like Huggies that parents trusted.

 

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And it differentiated me.

 

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It made me stand out amongst my competitors.

 

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And you’re probably thinking, like, I don’t get it.

 

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Like, why would Huggies want to do a promotion with you?

 

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You’re like this tiny person out of your second bedroom.

 

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 And the reason is like partnerships create conversation.

 

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There’s only so many ways that Jeep, you know, sorry, that Huggies can talk about nappies, right?

 

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Yeah.

 

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So they got linked to a trending brand that was in the media, that parents were talking about, that was really topical and on trend.

 

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And I got, as I said, what I got from it, I got a whole new

 

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 round of customers who didn’t even know that I existed.

 

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And I got exposure and that helped me get into a whole lot of new retailers.

 

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So that was my first like my first big bang into partnerships.

 

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And so I was I was hooked from that moment on that power of actually working with another brand who’s got the same customer as you and creating something amazing for them.

 

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 but the brand, you know, you’re not competing, you’re just, you’re complimenting, you’re just giving the customer a better outcome.

 

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 Yeah, I love that story.

 

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Such a powerful example of exactly what we’re here to talk about today, which is the idea of tapping into those partnerships for creating marketing in a very powerful way without spending a lot of money.

 

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Your tagline or byline of your book is marketing without money.

 

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And that’s really, I think, the power of partnerships when done right.

 

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Is that right according to you?

 

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Yes.

 

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 Absolutely.

 

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And that’s the power of it.

 

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I mean, it’s almost the secret sauce in marketing.

 

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We know, I mean, even I guess right now in this marketplace, it’s all about digital, it’s all about content.

 

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And we feel like we have to be always on and always doing content, constantly creating content.

 

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 But I guess my experience from so many years of doing partnerships is that when you talk about your products, yep, kind of interesting.

 

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But when somebody else talks about your product, it’s way more powerful, right?

 

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Like we listen, we ask our friends, hey, where should I go?

 

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What restaurant should I go to?

 

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And what products should I buy?

 

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And where are you going on holidays?

 

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 And as humans, we love interacting with other people and asking for their opinions.

 

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So as a consumer, when we’re working with other brands, if another brand is saying, oh my gosh, here’s this other brand and you should totally love them and use them and like them because of all these reasons, then it just elevates that content so much further.

 

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 And, and I think for me, like I’ve done lots of collaborations where I’ve had, you know, Facebook ads that I’ve been running about a company.

 

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So for example, the company had a competition running ads about the competition.

 

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So add one and two was, uh, you know, a company that I worked with that I loved and they actually created some content and said, Hey, you should totally enter this competition.

 

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 And that ad was about 10 times more effective than my enter my competition ad because somebody else who had credibility that people loved was actually talking about, hey, you know, hey, I’ve just seen this, you should totally take a look at it.

 

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 Yeah, awesome.

 

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So when you talk about partnerships, the way you describe it there, I think there’s the potential for, for listeners to think of that like influencer marketing, right?

 

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Like, so using someone else to talk who has an audience that you want to reach to talk about your, your brand or your product.

 

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Is there a differentiation in your mind between what you refer to as partnerships and what would typically be called influencer marketing?

 

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 Yes.

 

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Great question, Ben.

 

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Absolutely.

 

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So influencer marketing, brilliant marketing campaigns, amazing.

 

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But I guess an influencer is usually a person who has influence in usually one area.

 

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So they might have an amazing Facebook following, Instagram following, TikTok following,

 

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 So they are instrumental in a certain area of creating a change or recommendations.

 

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And so they use their authority or their credibility to influence us to do something.

 

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Amazing, I’ve used influencer marketing a lot and it is brilliant.

 

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The difference between that and brand partnership marketing or strategic marketing partnership

 

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 is as a brand, we have loads of things in our toolkit.

 

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So as a brand, you might have a physical location, you would have like a database, you would have obviously social campaigns, but you could have a sales force, you could actually have accredited programs that you run within an industry, you would have leadership within maybe to meet a safety code, you have personalities within the companies, different types of staff,

 

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 specialties more so than that.

 

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So as a brand, as a company, we have a whole lot of assets that we can draw on to help our customers have a great experience.

 

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So it could be even if you were like an e-commerce company, then obviously you’ve got your website and your digital platform, but you’re physically sending out product

 

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 to ship to a customer.

 

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Those boxes are amazing real estate.

 

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Those boxes are an opportunity to do collaborations on steroids.

 

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 If you’re actually a service provider, you’re actually going out and meeting people.

 

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You might be part of amazing networks, chambers, groups, associations.

 

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You might write for magazines.

 

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You have a whole lot of credibility and assets that is not just one platform.

 

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 So when we talk about the difference between influencer and brand, brand is where I’m, you know, influencer you would usually pay for and an influencer is I will give you money and you will create content in your own voice, but talk about my product.

 

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And when we go to a brand, we say, how can we create this amazing experience for our mutual customer and use everything in our toolkit to make sure it’s amazing for that customer?

 

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 Yeah.

 

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And that’s the difference.

 

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Yeah, I love it.

 

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Nice and clear.

 

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Thanks for sharing that.

 

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In your book, you refer to three different types of partnerships that brands can take advantage of.

 

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So, can you give us a quick description of those three different types and how they’re different and maybe examples of the kinds of businesses that might use that type of partnership?

 

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Absolutely.

 

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So, there’s three main

 

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 types.

 

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The first one is when you use your product or your service and you collaborate with another brand.

 

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The second one is where you use your IP or your knowledge and you create a digital collaboration.

 

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And the third is when you create an in-person experience.

 

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So kind of product, digital, in-person.

 

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And so some examples of that would be so when you put a product

 

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 or like two products or a product and a service together.

 

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So two products could be a great example is when Four Pillars Gin and GoTo Skincare came together and they created the new GoTo Gin.

 

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 So limited edition, it had go-to gins, you know, peach branding color.

 

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And so it had the flavor and the, you know, the graphic around it was this peach color.

 

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So it incorporated both their brands.

 

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They created a capsule collection, sold out within minutes and it’s done.

 

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And that’s the one that we see a lot when we actually are going into, you know, supermarket or anything else.

 

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So that’s when we see

 

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 you know, gay time biscuits, or we see different types of brands actually come together and create that product.

 

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The next one is when you use your product with a service.

 

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So for example, if there was an interior designer, so a professional service, and they collaborated with a furniture company, that would be when you actually have a product and a service.

 

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 And a great example of that is Jono Fleming is an interior designer, and he did a collaboration with Globe West Furniture, which is a brand of furniture that interior designers love.

 

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And they created a campaign where Jono actually wrote articles, created videos, created content on the big decisions that consumers had to make that they always had this kind of buyer’s remorse about.

 

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 What size rug is right for that dining room?

 

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And how much light do I need in a bedroom?

 

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And what shape lounge is best for this space?

 

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So he created the content.

 

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That content was then shared with all of his audience.

 

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Globe West then used it within their organization, not only in a digital way, but actually created in-person events where Jono actually helped their VIP customers pick that rug.

 

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 and they used it within an education.

 

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So they had a program where you actually could learn how to do it.

 

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And so they used it around the point of sale in the stores as well.

 

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So that’s a great example of a service and a product.

 

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From a digital point of view, this is when you could collaborate with

 

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 an organisation or another brand and so two of my favourites, so one is an association, so Zara is a consultant and she is a building biologist and she creates healthy homes.

 

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So she did a collaboration with the Australian Institute of Architects and created workshops about how to choose healthy building products.

 

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 that hundreds of architects actually jumped onto and really wanted to learn about.

 

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So for the Australian Institute of Architects, they had a gap.

 

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They didn’t have anybody that could talk about this topic that was in demand.

 

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And they didn’t have someone that was not biased.

 

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So they could get a product company to talk about their products.

 

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But obviously, you know, they’re only talking about that one product where she was talking about all the different products.

 

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 So that gave Australian Institute of Architects this really, they’re a member association, and so it gave them members something that they actually needed.

 

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They get CPD points to throw their accreditation, so it helped them from a learning point of view.

 

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And Zara, as a small business, actually got a heap of leads, and now she’s working with all these different architects on projects where the prerequisite is a healthy build.

 

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 Yep.

 

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00:20:02,958 –> 00:20:06,140

And so when you mentioned that being a digital… I’ll give you another one, Ben.

 

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Just a bit of clarification on that.

 

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You mentioned these being digital partnerships.

 

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In that case, was that like a webinar and that sort of content partnership?

 

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00:20:15,025 –> 00:20:16,126

Is that what you’re referring to?

 

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00:20:16,126 –> 00:20:18,007

Or was that like in-person workshops?

 

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Or is that moving into that experience one that we’re going to get to?

 

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00:20:22,349 –> 00:20:23,810

Great question.

 

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00:20:23,810 –> 00:20:26,612

So that was a webinar.

 

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00:20:26,612 –> 00:20:26,792

Okay.

 

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00:20:27,547 –> 00:20:34,410

 but it absolutely could have been in-person events in each different state.

 

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And so that’s, you’re spot on when you talk about that in terms of all of these things you can, you know, you can take across different mediums.

 

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So you could, for example, you could start with a webinar and actually test the appetite of the market.

 

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And then you could roll that into a physical in-person experience.

 

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 And I have another example of that kind of digital just from a multiple brand perspective.

 

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So a couple of mates got together.

 

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One was the gentleman and he actually takes the idea of the book out of your head and makes it into a Word document, your book.

 

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Next person is an accountability coach, keeps you on track.

 

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Next guy was actually a publisher, takes the Word document and actually makes it into a book.

 

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 And they teamed up with three other mates, which was a photographer, because you need a headshot on your book, a videographer who actually captured an amazing book trailer, which I’m sure many of your listeners do as well.

 

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 and the other one was a physical like printer that actually made the paperback like made it into a physical book you could hold in your hand.

 

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Now these six mates all had the same customer which was somebody who wanted to write a book.

 

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Authors that were writing a book or had just written a book or who wanted to buy who wanted to write a book and so all of them have that same customer but none of them compete.

 

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Now they created a competition where they actually

 

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 gave away kind of $5,000 worth of value.

 

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Each contributed $5,000 worth of value.

 

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So the total prize pool was a $30,000 book writing and publishing package.

 

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 which is amazing, right?

 

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So the customer gets this ultimate win.

 

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And in this customer, the digital content that was produced was about why all these elements were important.

 

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And they had the credibility of all these other professionals to work with.

 

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So that was a competition.

 

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It could have been a webinar series.

 

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00:22:48,917 –> 00:22:50,718

It could have been a podcast series.

 

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It could have been an in-person, you know, weekend workshop.

 

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Come and learn everything you need to know about writing a book in one weekend.

 

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00:22:58,823 –> 00:23:13,689

 But the, the output of that is an incredible database of their ideal customers that they can each market to individually for their service.

 

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So it creates an amazing asset that they can all use.

 

243

00:23:17,250 –> 00:23:17,650

Yeah.

 

244

00:23:17,650 –> 00:23:17,910

Yeah.

 

245

00:23:17,910 –> 00:23:18,911

Fantastic.

 

246

00:23:18,911 –> 00:23:27,714

So I think the third one we need to touch on as well, which is experiences, and maybe we’ve kind of touched on that, but is there a, is there more clarity to provide around that?

 

247

00:23:28,287 –> 00:23:29,587

 For sure.

 

248

00:23:29,587 –> 00:23:31,688

So these are my favorite.

 

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00:23:31,688 –> 00:23:43,631

An in-person experience tops everything else because when we actually come to an event, when it’s an in-person event, we remember everything.

 

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00:23:43,631 –> 00:23:50,473

We remember how it feels, the sound, the smells, the tastes, everything about it.

 

251

00:23:50,473 –> 00:23:55,715

And so an in-person experience is always the most impactful.

 

252

00:23:57,375 –> 00:24:03,480

 And some examples of that are, you know, a friend of mine is actually an artist.

 

253

00:24:03,480 –> 00:24:06,203

She has a new collection coming out.

 

254

00:24:06,203 –> 00:24:10,666

And so she actually did a collaboration with a restaurant.

 

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00:24:10,666 –> 00:24:13,509

And so they decided to get together.

 

256

00:24:13,509 –> 00:24:23,157

So they promoted in the restaurant and they promoted in the gallery and also out to their databases that they were creating a one night only event.

 

257

00:24:23,755 –> 00:24:29,038

 So you could come to the restaurant and you could meet Lara, the artist.

 

258

00:24:29,038 –> 00:24:36,702

Her art was all over the restaurant, so you could actually get up close and really see it in person.

 

259

00:24:36,702 –> 00:24:48,068

And Salvatore, who was the head chef, was so inspired by Lara’s artwork that he created a signature dish you could only get on that one night.

 

260

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 So the result of that was that Lara sold a whole lot of paintings to people that she didn’t know that the restaurant had actually bought in.

 

261

00:25:00,238 –> 00:25:10,584

And Lara bought in a whole heap of people that then knew about the restaurant, loved the food, had the best time ever and promised to become regulars.

 

262

00:25:10,584 –> 00:25:17,608

But I guess in terms of for the people who are listening today, I mean, there’s so many amazing events

 

263

00:25:17,967 –> 00:25:23,530

 that are in person where you could be part of that event.

 

264

00:25:23,530 –> 00:25:36,517

And for example, just say you created a 20 second LinkedIn video for every person who actually came up to you.

 

265

00:25:36,517 –> 00:25:42,000

And then of course, if they come up to you, well, you need to send them the video, right?

 

266

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So then by creating that video, then you get your email address and then they’re actually pushing it out.

 

267

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 And of course, you’re going to ask them to actually credit you for creating that video when they share it on LinkedIn or Instagram or which other platform as well.

 

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So one, you’ve got a whole database of people who’ve just got a small taste of your service, your style, your professionalism.

 

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00:26:09,301 –> 00:26:22,417

 And also you’ve got user generated content almost because you’ve actually got your quality, your video that’s being pushed out to their audiences and they’re promoting your name.

 

270

00:26:23,683 –> 00:26:24,523

 Yeah, I love that.

 

271

00:26:24,523 –> 00:26:25,464

That’s great.

 

272

00:26:25,464 –> 00:26:30,326

A great practical example that, you know, anyone can use from today as well.

 

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00:26:30,326 –> 00:26:44,794

I want to steer things now into some more of that practical element because I think people watching and listening are probably fired up a bit and ideas are probably bouncing around much like it is in my head right now about things that you can do in your own business or for your clients.

 

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00:26:44,794 –> 00:26:48,516

But I’d love to know how do you decide on kind of

 

275

00:26:49,456 –> 00:26:54,118

 where to go for partnerships that fit your brand and your goals as a business?

 

276

00:26:54,118 –> 00:26:58,959

Is there some criteria you look forward to make sure that there’s a good fit both ways?

 

277

00:26:58,959 –> 00:27:04,301

Because I guess it needs to be beneficial to both sides of that partnership, right?

 

278

00:27:04,301 –> 00:27:05,862

Yes, absolutely.

 

279

00:27:05,862 –> 00:27:09,583

If it’s only one-sided, it’s sponsorship, right?

 

280

00:27:09,583 –> 00:27:11,324

Or it’s advertising.

 

281

00:27:11,324 –> 00:27:15,225

If it’s only one side, then one side needs to pay.

 

282

00:27:15,225 –> 00:27:18,026

So it needs to be equal or

 

283

00:27:18,843 –> 00:27:21,284

 or at least balanced.

 

284

00:27:21,284 –> 00:27:32,948

So when you start to look at partnerships as part of your kind of marketing strategy, then really it’s about kind of, you know, three things, which is, you know, marketing, so it’s reach.

 

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00:27:32,948 –> 00:27:38,850

So who has got the reach that you need, that you can collaborate with.

 

286

00:27:38,850 –> 00:27:40,690

Credibility is the second one.

 

287

00:27:40,690 –> 00:27:45,472

So credibility, it might be around, so for example,

 

288

00:27:46,518 –> 00:27:57,060

 for everyone listening, maybe you are the official videographer for South by Southwest, something like that.

 

289

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So it could be around an event that would put you on the map, give you a head start to actually get some new deals because of the credibility of that name.

 

290

00:28:13,768 –> 00:28:16,829

 And the third is around differentiation.

 

291

00:28:16,829 –> 00:28:27,230

So what could you do to actually put yourself and your service together that would actually make you stand out from your competitors?

 

292

00:28:27,230 –> 00:28:33,992

Now, when we as small business owners, when we’re trying to wear all the hats, it’s hard, right?

 

293

00:28:33,992 –> 00:28:35,672

I totally get it.

 

294

00:28:35,672 –> 00:28:42,133

And so just like I’ve been with my husband for a very long time, 20 something years,

 

295

00:28:42,547 –> 00:28:44,148

 I won’t say how many.

 

296

00:28:44,148 –> 00:28:46,769

And, you know, he is he is amazing.

 

297

00:28:46,769 –> 00:28:47,510

Right.

 

298

00:28:47,510 –> 00:28:56,394

But I but I also have, you know, my family and I also have my best girlfriends and I also have, you know, work people that I adore.

 

299

00:28:56,394 –> 00:29:05,739

So don’t try to find, you know, the perfect person that’s going to deliver every single thing to you in one collaboration.

 

300

00:29:05,739 –> 00:29:09,421

So when you’re starting out, it’s really good to kind of identify what

 

301

00:29:11,680 –> 00:29:18,801

 you know, what’s one thing, what’s one objective that you would like to get done?

 

302

00:29:18,801 –> 00:29:25,003

And then you look for a partner that could help you just achieve that one objective.

 

303

00:29:25,003 –> 00:29:26,563

Yeah.

 

304

00:29:26,563 –> 00:29:36,505

For example, you might actually create some video content where you, where it might be around a target audience.

 

305

00:29:36,930 –> 00:29:53,205

 So say you were in the real estate, like homewares, building, real estate, so something around a house, a physical house where you’re filming, whether it’s the products or materials or the lifestyle, but around a house.

 

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00:29:54,099 –> 00:30:08,304

 then you would probably find a whole lot of brands that actually would not compete with you but would actually be in that area that could give you reach, credibility, or differentiation.

 

307

00:30:08,304 –> 00:30:18,627

So that might be that you, if you were a videographer in that home space, then you might team up with a stylist or you might team up with a buyer’s agent.

 

308

00:30:19,237 –> 00:30:35,620

 And so it could be a whole heap of people that are in that kind of customer journey that can then, that partner can then elevate your name, can actually push your name out and give you differentiation from your competitors.

 

309

00:30:35,620 –> 00:30:44,941

So, and as I said, that all that could be fashion or that could be music or it could be whatever is your, your field, your niche.

 

310

00:30:44,941 –> 00:30:48,542

Then who else is actually talking to that customer?

 

311

00:30:49,517 –> 00:30:53,578

 who comes before or after you.

 

312

00:30:53,578 –> 00:30:58,280

So it might be, just say you’re in home, then it might be a stylist who is before you.

 

313

00:30:58,280 –> 00:31:10,524

So actually doing collaborations with the stylist where then you’re actually photographing their work, then they will start recommending you because you make them look good.

 

314

00:31:10,524 –> 00:31:18,667

But it also could be that you guys team up together and actually talk about the five ways to style or things like that.

 

315

00:31:19,899 –> 00:31:39,564

 So when you’re looking for a partner, so again, just really simply, when we’re looking for a partner, we’re looking for what is our objective and do we want reach, credibility or differentiation and who, what other brands that have the same customer as you, which other brands could deliver one of those three objectives for you.

 

316

00:31:40,447 –> 00:31:41,427

 Yeah, I love that.

 

317

00:31:41,427 –> 00:32:08,680

And, you know, I think the key thing that I’m, I’m taking from that is partnerships don’t need to be these big brand collaborations that we talked about at the top of the episode, but for a small business out there or a service provider, it’s, it’s really, it can be just something quite organic and natural with other service providers or businesses that serve the same niche or the same audience around you, but looking for ways to be strategic about that partnership

 

318

00:32:09,538 –> 00:32:19,061

 And, you know, and planning for it, not just hoping that someone else is going to refer people to you because I don’t know, you, you like them.

 

319

00:32:19,061 –> 00:32:19,361

Right.

 

320

00:32:19,361 –> 00:32:23,183

So be strategic about it and planning for what is the activity?

 

321

00:32:23,183 –> 00:32:28,484

What is the partnership activity that we can do together for both of our audiences?

 

322

00:32:28,484 –> 00:32:30,245

That is a win-win for both.

 

323

00:32:30,245 –> 00:32:30,405

Right.

 

324

00:32:31,294 –> 00:32:32,735

 Yes, absolutely.

 

325

00:32:32,735 –> 00:32:34,696

So it has to be almost a three-way win.

 

326

00:32:34,696 –> 00:32:39,658

So it’s like, how does the customer win and then how can you both win at the same time?

 

327

00:32:39,658 –> 00:32:43,340

So what is the experience that you could give?

 

328

00:32:43,340 –> 00:32:57,547

So just in that last, so if you were actually going to real estate agents as a videographer and a stylist, and so we will make the house look good, we will get it ready and the product, the beautiful video will be created.

 

329

00:32:58,196 –> 00:33:03,381

 So that’s even better for that real estate agent because then they don’t have to find two people.

 

330

00:33:03,381 –> 00:33:08,646

The two people are working together to create that perfect outcome for that customer.

 

331

00:33:08,646 –> 00:33:11,589

So that is absolutely what we’re trying to do.

 

332

00:33:11,589 –> 00:33:15,253

And then, as I said, it’s around when I say it’s about balance.

 

333

00:33:15,253 –> 00:33:21,559

Otherwise, it’s one sided and it’s advertising.

 

334

00:33:21,559 –> 00:33:22,600

It might be that

 

335

00:33:23,869 –> 00:33:27,153

 somebody has something, it’s like, what do you need?

 

336

00:33:27,153 –> 00:33:28,554

What haven’t you got?

 

337

00:33:28,554 –> 00:33:30,416

What’s your strength?

 

338

00:33:30,416 –> 00:33:33,239

And what somebody else is lacking?

 

339

00:33:33,239 –> 00:33:39,906

So, just recently, I just put two brands together, which was one was a furniture brand.

 

340

00:33:39,906 –> 00:33:41,848

And so they were talking to me about

 

341

00:33:43,236 –> 00:33:56,099

 doing a launch in Brisbane and actually, you know, booking a hotel and just, you know, booking a room and putting their furniture into this room and inviting all the interior designers to come and see them.

 

342

00:33:56,099 –> 00:34:08,082

And I’m also working with another client who is an artist and they have just done some really amazing work and so are really elevating

 

343

00:34:09,165 –> 00:34:18,031

 He’s very much elevating him as an artist in the industry, but he does not know any interior designers at all.

 

344

00:34:18,031 –> 00:34:20,293

So I was like, hang on, I’ve got an idea.

 

345

00:34:20,293 –> 00:34:23,435

Why don’t you guys work together?

 

346

00:34:23,435 –> 00:34:29,560

So why don’t we put your furniture in his gallery with his art?

 

347

00:34:29,560 –> 00:34:32,101

One, the furniture is going to make the art look amazing.

 

348

00:34:34,008 –> 00:34:35,189

 and vice versa.

 

349

00:34:35,189 –> 00:34:40,853

So then the painting, the artworks are going to make the furniture look amazing.

 

350

00:34:40,853 –> 00:34:43,375

You’ve already got physical space.

 

351

00:34:43,375 –> 00:34:50,000

So as an artist, his asset was obviously his space, the gallery space.

 

352

00:34:50,000 –> 00:34:56,344

And the furniture brand, their asset was in their incredible relationships with interior designers.

 

353

00:34:56,344 –> 00:34:57,345

So the database,

 

354

00:34:58,103 –> 00:35:02,486

 So what does one brand have that the other brand doesn’t?

 

355

00:35:02,486 –> 00:35:05,968

And how can they create this amazing experience?

 

356

00:35:05,968 –> 00:35:08,589

So they had an exhibition.

 

357

00:35:08,589 –> 00:35:10,990

They invited all the interior designers.

 

358

00:35:10,990 –> 00:35:13,552

The interior designers obviously got to see the artwork.

 

359

00:35:14,790 –> 00:35:21,912

 And so that was great and the furniture brand didn’t have to hire an awful hotel room that was really cold.

 

360

00:35:21,912 –> 00:35:25,533

They actually got a really beautiful environment that was really welcoming.

 

361

00:35:25,533 –> 00:35:27,274

And so what did it cost them?

 

362

00:35:27,274 –> 00:35:31,855

It cost them a couple of bottles of champagne and some cheese and biscuits.

 

363

00:35:31,855 –> 00:35:32,275

That’s it.

 

364

00:35:33,744 –> 00:35:37,708

 So who are the brands that actually that you could collaborate with?

 

365

00:35:37,708 –> 00:35:40,830

And so when I’m saying, yeah, it’s about balance.

 

366

00:35:40,830 –> 00:35:43,693

So what do they both get out of it?

 

367

00:35:43,693 –> 00:35:49,998

And so they both got something great out of it, but it might not be the same thing.

 

368

00:35:49,998 –> 00:35:55,723

So one got to meet interior designers that they didn’t know, and one got to use a space that they didn’t have to pay for.

 

369

00:35:55,723 –> 00:35:56,644

Yeah, I love it.

 

370

00:35:56,644 –> 00:35:59,026

But it’s a win, win, win all around.

 

371

00:35:59,026 –> 00:36:00,447

So that’s fantastic.

 

372

00:36:01,262 –> 00:36:02,902

 Totally, a three-way win.

 

373

00:36:02,902 –> 00:36:06,163

So that’s the ultimate when you can have a three-way win.

 

374

00:36:06,163 –> 00:36:07,603

Yeah, absolutely.

 

375

00:36:07,603 –> 00:36:26,948

So, you know, Justine, as we wrap up here a little bit, Therese, so what would you say for someone who’s listening and maybe they are that smaller business or maybe they represent a bigger brand or a marketing for a bigger brand as well, like what would you say is kind of the action to take away from this episode to maybe

 

376

00:36:27,708 –> 00:36:30,710

 try and identify the right partners for them.

 

377

00:36:30,710 –> 00:36:36,494

What would be the next steps that you would suggest someone does if they’re thinking of exploring this marketing approach?

 

378

00:36:36,494 –> 00:36:37,775

Sure.

 

379

00:36:37,775 –> 00:36:46,781

So the first thing is you probably already have a whole load of brands that are already referring you.

 

380

00:36:46,781 –> 00:36:53,405

So natural word of mouth, people are saying, Oh, you should definitely use this videographer.

 

381

00:36:53,405 –> 00:36:55,226

You should definitely use this person.

 

382

00:36:55,226 –> 00:36:55,266

So

 

383

00:36:57,152 –> 00:36:58,233

 That is a referral.

 

384

00:36:58,233 –> 00:36:59,293

Great, right?

 

385

00:36:59,293 –> 00:37:00,094

Absolutely.

 

386

00:37:00,094 –> 00:37:02,515

And we love referrals.

 

387

00:37:02,515 –> 00:37:16,324

But what if we could take that referral and actually make it into some marketing material so that referral was like a little sprinkle of breadcrumbs all over the internet so then people could find you.

 

388

00:37:16,324 –> 00:37:21,127

So it wasn’t just relying on somebody actually saying your name out loud.

 

389

00:37:21,127 –> 00:37:22,028

It was actually

 

390

00:37:22,876 –> 00:37:25,358

 it was digitally done.

 

391

00:37:25,358 –> 00:37:28,920

So the first thing I’d say is like, who are you already working with?

 

392

00:37:28,920 –> 00:37:38,848

Like, who do you have great relationships with that you can actually, you know, strike up a conversation, what I call a curious conversation.

 

393

00:37:38,848 –> 00:37:44,572

And you say, hey, I know I’m always referring you, you’re always referring me.

 

394

00:37:44,572 –> 00:37:49,235

What if we actually got together and just created some content around this?

 

395

00:37:51,429 –> 00:37:53,610

 So people could find us both.

 

396

00:37:53,610 –> 00:38:02,255

What if we created a competition, a collaboration, an event, something where we can both gain from it?

 

397

00:38:02,255 –> 00:38:12,840

And the output of that would be either emails, content, it could be a collaboration, it could be the credibility.

 

398

00:38:12,840 –> 00:38:16,862

So as I said, it could be the reach, the credibility or the differentiation.

 

399

00:38:16,862 –> 00:38:17,923

And what you will find is,

 

400

00:38:19,238 –> 00:38:22,319

 Most of small business owners, we’re doing it all, right?

 

401

00:38:22,319 –> 00:38:25,941

As I said, we wear all the hats and it’s quite lonely.

 

402

00:38:25,941 –> 00:38:32,543

So one, it’s actually more fun to do marketing with mates.

 

403

00:38:32,543 –> 00:38:39,046

And two, it will deliver a better outcome because you’re having somebody else talk about your brand.

 

404

00:38:39,928 –> 00:39:02,032

 And so what I would absolutely say for you to do is pretty much grab a pen and look at who you’re already kind of working with that you could create something a little bit more, when I say formal, something that actually creates a whole lot of assets that is more than just somebody saying your name out loud.

 

405

00:39:02,032 –> 00:39:03,252

And that’s the first step.

 

406

00:39:03,252 –> 00:39:09,213

I mean, I work with lots of brands who actually, and we take them through, you know, who would be a great,

 

407

00:39:09,972 –> 00:39:17,215

 reach partner who would be a great credibility partner who would be a great differentiation partner so you can make more margin.

 

408

00:39:17,215 –> 00:39:24,938

I look at like what are all the assets that you’ve got and when I say assets I just mean as a business we have a huge amount of things that we

 

409

00:39:25,598 –> 00:39:28,861

 we just sit on, we probably don’t even realize that we’ve got.

 

410

00:39:28,861 –> 00:39:51,578

And so how do you kind of pitch, like what could you show that is in your toolkit to another brand to see what’s in their toolkit, to see that, you know, well, I’ve got this and you’ve got this, maybe we could come together and actually create something interesting, chat worthy, shareable, you know, that would give us something that we’re both wanting.

 

411

00:39:51,578 –> 00:39:53,819

So I want more followers, you want a database.

 

412

00:39:55,323 –> 00:39:56,744

 Therese, thank you so much.

 

413

00:39:56,744 –> 00:39:58,804

This has been an amazing episode.

 

414

00:39:58,804 –> 00:39:59,805

So many takeaways.

 

415

00:39:59,805 –> 00:40:04,926

I’ve taken so many notes myself about how I can utilize partnerships in my own business.

 

416

00:40:04,926 –> 00:40:09,548

So I assume our listeners have taken away a lot for themselves today as well.

 

417

00:40:09,548 –> 00:40:15,030

So just as we wrap up here, can you maybe mention a little bit about your book?

 

418

00:40:15,030 –> 00:40:16,190

Where can we get your book?

 

419

00:40:16,190 –> 00:40:23,773

What the title of your book is and how would you like people to connect with you further if they want to maybe connect and learn more about partnerships for their business?

 

420

00:40:25,037 –> 00:40:37,888

 Well, if you are interested in swap marketing without money, you can find it on Amazon, where it’s available in a paperback, a Kindle and an audio book.

 

421

00:40:37,888 –> 00:40:40,290

So whatever your flavour is.

 

422

00:40:40,290 –> 00:40:43,533

And then you can find me, Therese Tarlington.

 

423

00:40:43,533 –> 00:40:44,814

I’m the only one in the world.

 

424

00:40:44,814 –> 00:40:50,739

So you can find me on all the social platforms just under my name.

 

425

00:40:50,739 –> 00:40:53,021

Tarlington doesn’t have a G in it, just for that.

 

426

00:40:53,860 –> 00:41:12,589

 and absolutely I would love to work with anybody one-on-one who actually wants to really scope out your partnership potential and really unlock who those brands could be that you could collaborate with in the next year to really, really elevate your business.

 

427

00:41:12,589 –> 00:41:19,252

So thank you Ben, it has been a real pleasure speaking with you today and I appreciate your time.

 

428

00:41:19,752 –> 00:41:22,093

 Therese, thank you so much for joining me today.

 

429

00:41:22,093 –> 00:41:23,134

It has been awesome.

 

430

00:41:23,134 –> 00:41:24,614

Thank you very much.

 

431

00:41:24,614 –> 00:41:27,716

Thanks again to Therese for joining me on this episode.

 

432

00:41:27,716 –> 00:41:33,398

We did have a few technical issues in the recording of this episode, but hopefully it’s all come out well in the edits.

 

433

00:41:33,398 –> 00:41:40,941

But I certainly got a lot of value from what she shared today and it sparked a whole bunch of ideas for me, both for my own business and for some of our clients as well.

 

434

00:41:40,941 –> 00:41:42,322

And I hope it did for you too.

 

435

00:41:42,882 –> 00:41:44,823

 I’d love to know if you’ve got value from this episode.

 

436

00:41:44,823 –> 00:41:49,805

Leave a comment below if you’re watching on YouTube and let me know what you took away from this episode.

 

437

00:41:49,805 –> 00:41:59,388

And if you’re listening to the podcast, wherever you listen to podcasts, just email me ben at engage video marketing.com and we can start a conversation there.

 

438

00:41:59,388 –> 00:42:01,049

So thank you for joining me for this episode.

 

439

00:42:01,049 –> 00:42:02,409

I hope you got a lot of value.

 

440

00:42:02,409 –> 00:42:03,130

All the links to

 

441

00:42:03,930 –> 00:42:10,917

 Teresa’s book and so on that you can find in the show notes page at engagevideomarketing.com slash 287.

 

442

00:42:10,917 –> 00:42:15,922

And I’ll be back with you next week for another episode of the Engage Video Marketing Podcast.

 

443

00:42:15,922 –> 00:42:16,323

See you then.

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This eBook outlines the framework I’ve learnt  and have implemented for hundred’s of our  video agency clients over the last 7 years…  and I want to share it with you.

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